READING:

Good readers- good for f-3

I WONDER... with a simple smiley thinking

A list my year 3's made- they know these occur during independent reading

The basic principles of IPICK- promoting independent text selection


Right fit book- the FIVE FINGER test


Comprehension questions- Great for NAPLAN answering-
- embedded in the text
- embedded around text (captions, diagrams)
- your opinion about the text
Graham, Stephen. Teaching Writing Explicitly, Cengage, 2008.

Reading Star- great bookmark for emergent readers

Here, Hidden Head- A3- better definitions- one page per strategy

NAPLAN- Yr 3 Reading preparation

GENRE



For Aussie kids- with a focus on trying to include Australian authors on A4 posters- colour










LIBRARY:


Dewey Decimal posters


SENTENCE ACTIVITIES:



CAFE GOALS and DISPLAYS-


CAFE GOALS- A3- giant display

CAFE GOALS- A3 big display

CAFE GOALS- A4 sized bookmarks

CAFE GOALS- Transition skills- marking

CAFE GOALS- marking for individuals

COMPREHENSION POSTERS-

they have a series of questions at the bottom of each poster.

17 COMPREHENSION POSTERS- A3






Use the PIDE poster in the first column of new

What is the purpose of the piece of writing?
P- Persuade
I- Inform
D- Describe
E- Entertain


Making connections- use with the Text to self, Text to world, Text to text comprehension poster

Making connections- use with the Text to self, Text to world, Text to text comprehension poster

Inference activity


Reading for meaning- yesterday, today, tomorrow









WRITING:


Good Writers- Good for p-3



A series of goals- 5 for increasing volume and stamina,

5 for grammar and five for handwriting- students are good

placing themselves on this scale- it also give them three

concise goals for each term...

you may want to the change the font to suit your country.


SENTENCES:


Colourful Semantics- a speech therapist made this for EAL
students when a colleague of mine was working in London.
It is an amazing resource I will use next term for a little man
I teach who is intellectually impaired and EAL.
Thank you Amanda!

I have put the publisher file in here too, because there may be
different spellings etc.... for example British say sweets,
Americans say candy and Aussies say lollies...



TEXT TYPES:



This work has been created by Stephen Graham.
But I have made it into a powerpoint you can use for teaching.
Graham, Stephen. Teaching Writing Explicitly, Cengage



Cut up the title, structure, features, grammar.... mix them up,

give them to students and have them piece together the types








My friend and teacher Kim McLean devised one page and
I added another and a few structural cues for the IWB.
MORE NARRATIVE DICE GAMES:





PUNCTUATION:

One page posters Casey Park made in 2005




PARTS OF SPEECH:

Posters I made in 2005.


SPELLING:


4 types of word word to learn to spell words:
- morphology- walk, walks, walked, walker, walking.
- visual- the way a word is shaped and looks-HWF
- phonological- being able to hear the sounds within the word-str-ee-t.
- etymological- base words which usually come from arabic, latin and ancient greek. eg. mono.
Graham, Stephen. Teaching Writing Explicitly, Cengage, 2008.

Great activities for weekly spelling words.

CVC Rhymes:













Vowels- Short vowels with pictures and gestures-
the information was passed onto me from a Speechie and is great for hearing the vowel.

CVC WORDS














A sounds












E sounds


I sounds






O sounds







BLENDS DIGRAPHS etc...







LISTENING and SPEAKING:

SPEAKING:



Think aloud- essential for Guided Reading and reflection about texts. Sets of questions for Previewing, Predicting, Comprehending, Connecting and Think aloud.
The pdf is a fan to make for a key chain... laminate, hole punch and use as a talking stick

Mandy Regan gave me these and I added a bit of kid friendly design to make a fan.

Brain Gym for SPEAKING

SENTENCES:



Colourful Semantics- a speech therapist made this for EAL
students when a colleague of mine was working in London.
It is an amazing resource I will use next term for a little man
I teach who is intellectually impaired and EAL.
Thank you Amanda!


I have put the publisher file in here too, because there may be
different spellings etc.... for example British say sweets,
Americans say candy and Aussies say lollies...


RHYTHM AND LISTENING:


Brain Gym for LISTENING


A clapping rhythm- very cross-synaptic centered . With embedded sound tracks and lyrics

How loud can they get? Put it on a fan of coloured papers and add a dial or coloured magnet to monitor the volume of the room.